• Kieran Burt

Finding Abraham (2022) Review

Updated: Apr 23


Finding Abraham is a short, unconventional documentary that follows a group of young people from different walks of life as they talk about the Abraham Peace Accords. This leads to a lively, upbeat story about a topic where all too often only the negatives are focused on.


The director, Malcolm Green, should be praised for managing exactly this. Oftentimes, documentaries bring a top-down focus to their subject, and trap its focus on a presenter. Finding Abraham takes a more interesting approach, exploring how politics can affect people on the ground. This bottom-up angle avoids boxing this issue into a textbook, simply explaining facts without any real narrative.


This unconventionality is hinted at well in the poster. Instead of opting for an orientation that goes with the norm, it is flipped 180 degrees so it is upside down. It subtly conveys that idea that the traditional documentary-style audiences are used to is not going to be used here, so they need to pay attention. The use of nontraditional camera angles continues into the film, showing that it is not just the subject matter that is going against the norm, but the cinematography too.


Overall, this documentary succeeds in telling unique, individual stories, setting it apart from others that take a more traditional approach

The film offers a real insight into how people feel about the Accords, providing an authentic, real story, which few will have seen before. These countries are featured in the news a lot, but lack the personal side that this Finding Abraham brings. Its diverse range of interviews also allows a fuller picture of what the region looks like - again, something that is rarely shown in other media - bringing the views of how people want to improve their lives, and grow closer together as a community.


Overall, this documentary succeeds in telling unique, individual stories, setting it apart from others that take a more traditional approach. This and its fast pace serves to engage the audience, and leaves them wanting more.


8/10