• Sebastian Mann

Antivirus (2020) Review


Greek writer-director Anastasia Sima’s latest short film, Antivirus, is a lockdown-inspired look at the importance of communication in an isolated apartment block.


Daphne, a young jazz singer played by Ksenia Dania, is certainly a relatable character. She wanders her apartment aimlessly, sorting through her books and old family photos. She’s not remodelling the place, just after something to fill the days. It’s the beginning of the coronavirus lockdown in Athens, and the tedium has already set in. It’s not a totally unheard of concept.

It’s an accurate portrait of lockdown blues, but its more inspired ideas get lost in the humdrum

Her only meaningful interaction with the people around her is in the form of an ongoing feud she has with an adjoining neighbour. They communicate primarily through bangs on the wall, usually intended to tell the other to keep it down. They seem more than a little vindictive, venting their perhaps understandable frustration at her loud vocal exercises by leaving post-it notes on her door instructing her to shut up and leave.

Antivirus is a lonely experience. Daphne is the only person we ever see on-screen, and outside of her muttering and cursing to herself, there’s little in the way of dialogue. It’s slow, full of malaise.


But, despite its short runtime, it’s a struggle to engage in a meaningful way. Save for its optimistic closer, it’s a little one-note and, truthfully, a little bland. It’s an accurate portrait of lockdown blues, but its more inspired ideas get lost in the humdrum.


6/10


Antivirus is now available to watch at the LA Greek Film Festival.