• Charlie Vogelsang

And I Miss You Like A Little Kid (2022) Review


Written and directed by Benjamin Hosking, And I Miss You Like A Kid is a psychological drama showcasing the spiralling relationship of two people in Covid-era Los Angeles.


It’s safe to say that everyone struggled throughout the pandemic and in lockdowns, but none quite as much as Jason (played by Chris Zylka) in And I Miss You Like A Little Kid. At the start of the pandemic, he begins dating an enigmatic and beautiful woman named Clarissa (played by Teri Reeves), but the relationship soon begins to fall out of the honeymoon period.


Just a couple of months into the relationship, it becomes apparent that both of these people suffer with psychological issues and that being together is unhealthy for them. Not wanting to be alone throughout the pandemic, Jason asks Clarissa to move in with him - and this is where everything begins to spiral even more.

The audience has to infer a lot as the director gives them the chance to put the pieces together themselves - not many can successfully pull this off, but Hosking does so brilliantly

Clarissa begins to turn off her charm and instead becomes manipulative and emotionally abusive towards Jason. However, he remains with her as he is inexperienced in relationships and struggles with being alone. That is, until he reaches his breaking point and falls back into troublesome habits that are only mocked by Clarissa.


For the first couple of minutes, the music and the overall cinematography showcases the film as an idyllic romantic comedy - but this is soon flipped as the abuse begins. This is where the shots soon become close-ups and feel quite claustrophobic and uncomfortable, perfectly emulating the relationship on screen.

It’s rare to see a film depicting domestic abuse on a man, but this film handles it with compassion. Ultimately, the entire cast acts out each part with dignity and humility as every character feels human and not like a caricature.


The best way to describe And I Miss You Like A Little Kid is subtle. In regards to the acting, the message and the story, everything is shown to you rather than told. The audience has to infer a lot as the director gives them the chance to put the pieces together themselves - not many can successfully pull this off, but Hosking does so brilliantly, and it's what makes the short film memorable.


8/10


And I Miss You Like a Little Kid is showing at the Dances with Films Festival