• Kieran Burt

A Brixton Tale (2021) Review


A Brixton Tale primarily follows two characters, Leah (Lily Newmark), a wealthy vlogger, and Benji (Ola Orebiyi), a shy youth from the Barrier Block housing project. Her relationship with Benji will draw him down a dangerous path, which ultimately leads to catastrophic consequences.


There are a few themes presented in this film. Firstly, and most overtly, is that of race and class. Leah lives a life of luxury, and is attempting to get a job through her vlogging and her wealthy connections.


Benji, on the other hand, is someone who lives in an area impacted by deprivation and racism. There are multiple instances in the film where Archie is the victim of racial profiling by the police, and he has little say in the life-changing events that unfold.

The movie is shot brilliantly and is also quite short, meaning it doesn’t overstay its welcome or lose audience interest

As well as race and class, another theme A Brixton Tale looks into is living through screens. Leah is constantly behind her camera, filming everything. Benji has a great piece of dialogue where he comments that everyone is an actor because people learn behaviour through imitation. There are several points where the film is shown from the perspective of Leah’s camera, or Benji being behind other screens.


The movie is shot brilliantly and is also quite short, meaning it doesn’t overstay its welcome or lose audience interest.


However, when A Brixton Tale introduces Charles (Barney Harris), an ex of Leah's, the film becomes a little less focused; concentrating on the main duo through to the end would have been far more powerful.


Overall, this film presents a visceral experience for its audience. Its core message is presented with simplicity, though is meaningful and relevant to a world increasingly aware of the importance of tackling key social issues.


7/10